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Monday, April 27, 2009

Information about Banknote Grading :

Banknotes are usually graded on a descriptive scale of grades. These grades vary somewhat internationally, and as time goes on more grades have been added. The grades specified by the International Bank Note Society are as follows:
Uncirculated (UNC) - refers to a banknote that is bright and has no handling damage, such as folds or creases, nor any cuts, stains, or rounded corners
About uncirculated (AU) - a banknote that is still bright but has trivial handling damage, i.e a light center fold (not a crease, which is a break of the fibres of the paper), without rounded corners.
Extremely fine (XF or EF) - a banknote with one crease or up to three light folds. Paper still bright and attractive, very slight wear to corners allowed.
Very Fine (VF) - Note still attractive, but possible slight dirt or smudging, may have several horizontal and/or vertical folds. Paper remains relatively crisp. No tears, but slight wear to edges and corners is allowable.
Fine (F) - Paper is now slightly soft, considerable wear due to folds from use in circulation. Minor tears to note, not extending into the design. Clear but not bright in appearance. Staple holes but not holes due to folding.
Very Good (VG) - Much wear. Paper is limp. Tears can extend into the design. Staining possible. Discoloration possible. Hole at center caused by folding allowable. Note still looks presentable.
Good (G) - Very much wear, as VG, but more so. Graffiti on note. Small pieces of the note may be missing
Fair - Larger pieces of note torn off/missing, compared with G. Less of the note intact.
Poor - Severe damage due to wear, staining, missing pieces, graffiti and/or holes. May be taped together, have pieces missing. The worst possible condition.
In addition to these grades, it is common to indicate an in-between grade, such as AU-UNC, which is a note that falls between AU and UNC, e.g., because has barely a noticeable counting fold.
Certain vendors and auctioneers break the UNC grade down further, into three grades.
Gem Uncirculated or Gem Crisp Uncirculated - A perfect note, not just in original condition, but with large equally balanced margins, outstanding colour. Thus such a note is not just as originally printed, but was also printed well in the first place.
Choice Uncirculated/Crisp Choice Uncirculated - Just less than perfect, tiny foxing, faint counting smudges, or slightly off-center margins
Uncirculated/Crisp Uncirculated - Still not folded or creased, but suffering from any of: slight fading, yellowing, foxing, very off-center margins, corner folds only in the blank area (not the design)
Collectors will always prefer an Uncirculated note, and these notes command substantial premiums over lower grades. A note in UNC condition is generally worth up to ten times more in this condition compared with merely VG (Very Good). An UNC note can be worth three times as much as a VF one. For notes seldom found in uncirculated condition, the premium may be even higher. The difference between Gem Uncirculated and Uncirculated can also be substantial. As a result, buyers are at risk of grade inflation, in that a dealer failing to notice a fold in an AU note and passing it off as UNC will undoubtedly feel justified in charging a higher price.
Bank notes below VF are usually considered undesirable in a collection, and are generally purchased where better-quality examples are either unavailable due to their scarcity or simply beyond the collector's budget. Common notes in such poor condition, however, are effectively unsaleable for anything above their face value (assuming they are still legal tender).
Various third party grading company's (TPG) offer the service of authentication, grading and cataloging of common varieties of paper currency. These TPG's typically use a seventy-point grading scale to describe the note. Additional notations may be made for exceptional paper quality or other varieties.
Following examination, TPG companies typically encapsulate the currency in what is commonly referred to as a "slab." Similar to the issues surrounding the transition that occurred within the coin collecting field many years ago, controversy exists about the need or value of TPG notes. Without having the ability to closely examine and feel the note due to it being sealed inside the slab, many collectors are not comfortable accepting the opinion of others as to the grade and may either elect not to purchase the note or to cut it out of the slab for examination. Additionally, many noted mistakes in grading by third party grading services have been discovered. However, for collectors less adept at grading, purchasing a note in a slab can provide some additional comfort for the owner in justifying the purchase and cost. It also serves to help protect the collector against unethical activities designed to increase the worth of the note by pressing out folds, washing, repairing tears, or other alterations typically viewed as unacceptable thereby lowering the value of the item.
The vast majority of bank notes are sold using the Uncirculated-Poor grading system, and are never graded with any third party.

Banknote : Bangladesh



Bangladesh
2 Taka, Issued in 2007

Banknote : Bangladesh


Bangladesh
5 Taka, Issued in 2007

Saturday, April 25, 2009

Banknote : Taiwan (R.O.C) (Country#61)


Taiwan (Republic of China)
100 Yuan, Issued in 2000
Thanks to
Kai Hsu (Taiwan)

Banknote : Mozambique



Mozambique
50 Metical, Issued in 1986
Thanks to
Carlos Alberto de Araújo Pinto (Mozambique)

Banknote : Mozambique



Mozambique
1000 Metical, Issued in 1989
Thanks to
Carlos Alberto de Araújo Pinto (Mozambique)

Banknote : Mozambique (Country#60)


Mozambique
20 Metical, Issued in 2006
Thanks to
Carlos Alberto de Araújo Pinto (Mozambique)

Banknote : St. Thomas and Prince (Country#59)


St. Thomas & Prince
5000 Dobras, Issued in 2004
Thanks to
Carlos Alberto de Araújo Pinto (Mozambique)

Banknote : Myanmar


Myanmar
20 Kyat, Issued in 1994
Thanks to
Carlos Alberto de Araújo Pinto (Mozambique)

Banknote : Mongolia (Country#58)



Mongolia
1 Tugrik, Issued in 1993
Thanks to
Carlos Alberto de Araújo Pinto (Mozambique)

Banknote : Laos (Country#57)


Laos
20 Kip, Issued in 1979.
Thanks to
Carlos Alberto de Araújo Pinto (Mozambique)

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Banknote : Hong Kong 香港



Hong Kong
10 Dollars, Issued in 1 July 2002

Hong Kong (Chinese: 香港), officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China.
A Special Administrative Region (SAR) is a highly autonomous and largely self-governing subnational entity of the People's Republic of China. Each SAR has a gubernatorial chief executive as head of the region and head of government. Each region's government, however, is not fully independent, in as much as foreign policy and military defense are retained as the responsibility of the nation and its central government.
The People's Republic of China, at present, has two Special Administrative Regions, Hong Kong and Macau. They should not be confused with Special Economic Zones, which are regions fully under the administration of the Central People's Government. Article 31 of the Constitution of the People's Republic of China authorities the National People's Congress to create Special Administrative Regions.
Banknotes:
The issue of banknotes of the Hong Kong dollar is governed in the Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong by the Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA), the governmental currency board of Hong Kong. Under license from the HKMA, three commercial banks issue their own banknotes for general circulation in the region. Notes are also issued by the HKMA itself.
In most countries of the world the issue of banknotes is handled exclusively by a single central bank or government. The arrangements in Hong Kong are unusual but not unique, as a comparable system is used in the United Kingdom, where eight banks issue banknotes.
The Government, through the Hong Kong Monetary Authority, authorizes three commercial banks to issue currency notes in Hong Kong:
The Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited;
the Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong) Limited; and
the Bank of China (Hong Kong) Limited.
Authorization is accompanied by a set of terms and conditions agreed on between the Government and the three note-issuing banks. Banknotes are issued by the three banks, or redeemed, against payment to, or from, the Government Exchange Fund in US dollars, at a specified rate of US$1 to HK$7.80 under the Linked Exchange Rate system. Banknotes issued by the three commercial banks are printed in Hong Kong by Hong Kong Note Printing Limited.

Saturday, April 18, 2009

Banknote : German Reich Republic

German Reich Republic
20000 Mark, Issued in 20 Sept. 1923
Many Thanks to FRANZ DIPPNER

Banknote : German Reich Republic




German Reich Republic
20 Mark, Issued in 30 Aug. 1924
Many Thanks to FRANZ DIPPNER

Banknote : German Reich Republic


German Reich Republic
10 Mark, Issued in 30 Aug. 1924
Many Thanks to FRANZ DIPPNER

Friday, April 17, 2009

Banknote : German Reich Republic



German Reich Republic
100000 Mark, Issued in 1 Feb. 1923
Many Thanks to FRANZ DIPPNER

Banknote : German Reich Republic


German Reich Republic
1.000.000Mark, Issued in 20 Feb 1923
Many Thanks to FRANZ DIPPNER

Banknote : German Reich Republic



German Reich Republic
50000 Mark, Issued in 19 Nov. 1922
Many Thanks to FRANZ DIPPNER

Banknote : German Reich Republic



German Reich Republic
1000 Mark, Issued in 15 Sept. 1922
Many Thanks to FRANZ DIPPNER

Banknote : German Reich Republic (Country#56)



German Reich Republic
10000 Mark, Issued in 19 Jan 1922
Many Thanks to FRANZ DIPPNER
Deutsches Reich was the official name for Germany from 1871 to 1945 in the German language. Its direct literal translation in English is “German Empire”, however this full translation is only used when describing Germany under Hohenzollern rule (until 1918). For the entire 1871-1945 period, the English name given for Germany was the partially translated “German Reich” (pronounced /ˈdʒɝmən ˈraɪx/)Following the German Kaiser’s (again partially translated, German Emperor fully translated) abdication of the German Empire after World War I, the word “Empire” was dropped and the official name used in English was the “German Reich”. Informally, this nation was also simply known as Germany.
The name “deutsches Reich” was also often applied in contemporary maps to the supranational Holy Roman Empire (911–1806). The history of Germany during the time of the (second) German Reich is conventionally broken into three distinct periods:
· the monarchy under Hohenzollern rule, known in English as the German Empire (1871-1918)
· the democratic republic, known retrospectively as the Weimar Republic (1919-1933)
· the totalitarian dictatorship commonly known as the Third Reich or Nazi Germany (1933-1945)
Following the de-facto annexation of Austria in 1938, Germany informally named itself the Greater German Reich (German: Großdeutsches Reich). This name was made the official state name only during the last two years (1943-1945) of Nazi rule.

Banknote : Macedonia


Macedonia
10 Denari, Issued in 2002

Thanks to SLOBODAN ILIJOSKI (Macedonia)
Swap Through : http://monetastic.ning.com/

Banknote : Macedonia


Macedonia
50 Denari, Issued in 1992

Thanks to SLOBODAN ILIJOSKI (Macedonia)
Swap Through : http://monetastic.ning.com/

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Banknote : Macedonia



Macedonia
25 Denari, Issued in 1992

Thanks to SLOBODAN ILIJOSKI (Macedonia)
Swap Through : http://monetastic.ning.com/

Banknote : Macedonia (Country#55)


Macedonia
10 Denari, Issued in 1992

Thanks to SLOBODAN ILIJOSKI (Macedonia)
Swap Through : http://monetastic.ning.com/

Banknote : Ecuador (Country#54)


Ecuador
5 Sucres
Thanks to Pedro Brazil

Banknote : Cambodia (Country#53)


First Banknote from Cambodia
50 Riels, Issued in 2002
Thanks to Igore Adolph

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Banknote : Poland



Poland
100 Zlotych
Many Thanks to Kazimierz Roman Leszczynski